Indian rulers have traditionally been a corrupt lot

For the Love of Money, Hand in Graft

India should take lessons from some of its neighbours to put an end to corruption

Indians have always been hopelessly divided amongst themselves. Small states, enclaves, principalities and kingdoms dotted the landscape in the past. So much so that at the time of Independence, there existed more than 500 principalities spanning from Khyber to Kohima, and from Karakorum to Kanyakumari.

Nevertheless, one of the remarkably consistent features about India as a nation has been the failure of its rulers to protect the borders from adversaries. Virtually every aggressor, from Alexander the Great to the Mughal king, Babur, and later, the British, was able to conquer this nation with considerable ease.

There indeed appears to be something peculiar in the collective psyche of Indians. Indian rulers have traditionally been a corrupt lot. The vice was born out of their inherent love of money. Generations of Indians have been brought up with the belief that what matters most in life is wealth.

Things haven’t changed for the better, even six decades after Independence. How else can one explain the action of Babubhai Katara, a member of parliament, who chose to smuggle out people by issuing false passports in return of a hefty payment?

Unfortunately, the Indian ruling class has always hesitated to take punitive action against corrupt elements who are hell-bent on jeopardizing the security of the nation. One wonders whether there is any real need of ‘foreign hands’ such as the ISI, or militant outfits like Ulfa and the Maoists when Indians themselves appear to be committed to break the system from within! Perhaps India could lessons from one of its powerful neighbours, China, to take corrective action before it is too late.

It is true that even China is not free from the scourge of corruption. But the Chinese government has taken a hard stance to curb the malady. Thus, the Chinese president, Hu Jintao, has launched a high-profile campaign against institutional corruption in his country. The beauty of the Chinese story is that the government decided to act tough instead of making grand promises which are never fulfilled.

Zhang Enzhao, president of China Construction Bank, one of the leading State-owned commercial banks in Beijing, resigned in March last year over allegations that he had taken bribes from an American contractor. Among government officials arrested or sentenced for corruption in 2005-2006 were the deputy governor of Sichuan province, the deputy party secretary of the ruling communist party in Shanxi, the transportation bureau chiefs in Henan and the deputy mayor of Suzhou.

In Indonesia, perceived as one of world’s most corrupt nations, anti-corruption measures proved to be surprisingly effective. A newly constituted anti-corruption commission and the ad hoc courts put the governor of Aceh province behind bars for 10 years for his role in a multi-million-dollar bribery scandal.

It would be better for India to emulate the Chinese in order to rid the country of corruption. The strictest punishment should be meted out to those who compromise the nation’s polity, economy and security for money. Else, our founding fathers would continue to turn in their graves to find their successors making a mockery of their cherished ideals.

ABHIJIT BHATTACHARYYA, The Telegraph, June 07, 2007

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: